Politics and Government

Yellow Jacket Disaster

Gold Hill's Yellow Jacket Disaster was probably the worst mining accident in Nevada history. On the morning of April 7, 1869, fire spread at the 800-foot level. As the day crew descended, smoldering timbers collapsed, flooding poisonous air into the Yellow Jacket and neighboring Kentuck and Crown Point Mines. Fortunately, shifts were changing or casualties would have been higher. Nevertheless, survivors described horrible scenes of miners desperately struggling for life.

Alice Key: A Renaissance Woman

Dancer, journalist, community activist, and political leader, Alice Key made many contributions to Las Vegas and civil rights.

Born on March 18, 1911 in Henderson, Kentucky, she moved as an infant to Riverside, California, with her entire family. She grew up across the street from her grandfather, who instilled a fierce black pride in her. On the day of her high school graduation in 1928, she left to join her mother, who had taken a position in Los Angeles a few months earlier.

Zoray Andrus

Zoray Andrus is often identified with the artistic fortunes of Virginia City. A native of Alameda, California, she attended California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, and studied with a number of influential artists including Hans Hoffman at the University of California–Berkeley. Andrus arrived on the Comstock in 1935.

Al Livingston

Al Livingston, one of Nevada's first settlers, became an architect of a tourism approach to the state's budget woes at the end of the nineteenth century.

Nuclear Testing Before Nevada (1942-1950)

The Nevada Test Site was the United States’ Cold War continental nuclear proving ground. Nuclear weapons testing began during World War II and came of age during the Cold War. The nuclear tests conducted in Nevada between 1951 and 1992 had their origins in major scientific discoveries of the twentieth century.

Nuclear Weapons Testing and Use during World War II

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